Meenakshi Rao Lab

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is unique among other organs because it has its own intrinsic nervous system that can function largely independently to regulate a variety of digestive and metabolic functions. Our lab uses mouse genetic models, in vivo and in vitro assays to investigate how information about nutrients, microbes, and mechanical stimuli is detected and used by this enteric nervous system (ENS) to regulate GI motility, appetite, epithelial repair and immune responses. Our work is directly relevant to digestive disorders and obesity.

Lab members

  • Meenakshi Rao, MD, PhD (Principal Investigator)
  • Daniella Rastelli (Research Technologist)
  • Salima Soualhi, PhD (Postdoctoral research fellow)
  • Kristina Perez (Undergraduate student, Boston College)

Lab alumni

  • Sophia Chiu (Medical student, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
  • Lauren Dong (Ph.D. candidate in Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical School)
  • Svetlana Sabel (Attending Physician, St. Barnabas Medical Center)
  • Farah Karim (Dental student, University of Washington)
  • Esther Mezhibovsky (Ph.D. candidate in Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University)
  • Anjali Agarwalla (Medical student, University of Pennsylvania)
  • Christie Gutierrez (Clinical fellow, Columbia University Medical Center)
  • Bryana Belin (Lab technician, Columbia University Medical Center)
  • Laurence Feinstein (Assistant Professor, Drexel University School of Medicine)

Selected publications

Kulkarni S, Ganz J, Bayrer J, Becker L, Bogunovic M, Rao M. Advances in Enteric Neurobiology: The "Brain" in the Gut in Health and Disease. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience. 2018; 38(44):9346-9354.

Rao M, Rastelli D, Dong L, Chiu S, Setlik W, Gershon MD, Corfas G. (2017) Enteric glia regulate gastrointestinal motility but are not required for maintenance of the epithelium in mice. Gastroenterology, 153, 1068-1081. Featured as cover article.

Rao M, Gershon MD. Enteric nervous system development: what could possibly go wrong? Nature reviews. Neuroscience. 2018; 19(9):552-565.

More publications

Contact information and open positions

We recently moved to Boston Children’s and we are interested in recruiting talented trainees at all levels (post-doctoral research fellows, graduate and undergraduate students, medical students and residents) to join our team. If you are excited about pursuing questions that will advance the fundamental understanding of enteric neurobiology in health and disease, please contact me with an email articulating your interests and experience.

Meenakshi Rao, MD, PhD
Meenakshi.Rao@childrens.harvard.edu